Audi Q4 E-tron Spied With Production Body, Closely Resembles The Concept


Audi introduced the Q4 e-tron concept at the 2019 Geneva Motor Show, and now we’re getting a glimpse at the upcoming production model.

Dressed in heavy camouflage, the prototype features a wide grille that is flanked by LED headlights. We can also see triangular intakes and a wide lower opening.

Further back, there’s a rakish windscreen which flows into a sloping roof. The model has also been equipped with aerodynamic wheels, an upward sweeping beltline and pronounced rear fenders which mirror those used on the concept.

Also Read: Audi Q4 E-Tron Wears VW ID.4 Body As Camouflage

The rear end features an angular rear window and a protruding spoiler. We can also see slender LED taillights and a fairly conventional bumper.

Spy photographers couldn’t get close enough to snap interior pictures, but Audi has previously said the Q4 e-tron will offer “unsuspected spaciousness and comfort.” In particular, the model will lack a transmission tunnel and this will help to create an open and airy cabin.

Specifications remain a mystery, but the Q4 e-tron will ride on the MEB platform that underpins the Volkswagen ID.3 and ID.4. If it echoes the concept, we can expect an 82 kWh battery and two electric motors that give the model all-wheel drive as well as a combined out 302 hp (225 kW / 306 PS). They enabled the concept to run from 0-62 mph (0-100 km/h) in 6.3 seconds, before hitting an electronically limited top speed of 112 mph (180 km/h).

In terms of range, the concept could travel more than 280 miles (450 km) on a single charge in the WLTP cycle. Audi also said the battery could be charged at up to 125 kW and this enabled the concept to get an 80 percent charge in “hardly more than 30 minutes.”

The Q4 e-tron will be built at Volkswagen’s Zwickau plant and the model is slated to be introduced in the second half of this year. However, the coronavirus pandemic could delay things a bit.
























Picture credits: CarPix for Carscoops



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